Scottie is getting a refresh

After 2.5 years, the Scottie dog was ready for a face lift

When I started my business in mid-2015, I found naming it was one of the most difficult things I had to do. I knew what my services were, I knew who my clients were, but I really didn't know what to call it. I cam to Scottie Public Affairs after doing some exercises about what was meaningful to me and what I wanted to project about my business. 

If you're not familiar with why I came to Scottie, the short version is that I wanted my clients to know I was tenacious and feisty and I'd fight for them - like a terrier. Also, my grandmother is Scottish and used to have a Scottie dog, so it was also a nod to my heritage. 

I had the opportunity, through the Chatham Women's Center for Entrepreneurship to get some free labor from a marketing graduation student at Chatham, and I took it! I loved my old Scottie dog, but I wouldn't say we did an extensive branding exploration when we pulled the original logo and site together. I thought there might be a way to keep the essence of it, but tweak the logo to tell someone more about the business. 

scottie logo.png

So, what's new? The Scottie has a little more attitude now - he's ready to pounce. And we brought the speech bubbles in to convey more of the communications work that I do, which was missing from the logo before. Finally the font has changed to a clean, modern sans-serif. And for my own selfish reasons, I really wanted a font that was in Canva, which is my new tool for creating idiot-proof social media graphics. 

We're Hiring!

Scottie Public Affairs, a two-year old communications firm in Pittsburgh with local and national clients, is hiring an associate to start immediately. As an associate, you would assist the founder with a wide variety of tasks, in client services as well as administrative and office management tasks that are key to growing the company.

Clients are political clients, issue advocacy organizations, and corporations. Client services tasks include: participating in client calls and meetings; staffing clients and client travel when requested; writing first drafts of proposals, pitches, plans, releases, statements, and more; pitching media; assisting with media training and learning basic video software; learning basic graphic design program to create social media graphics; staffing media training, public speaking training and debate prep, and staffing clients on interviews and at public speeches.

Administrative and office management tasks include: booking travel; answering phones; logging messages; ordering office supplies; working with vendors; identifying new vendors or services for Scottie to use; paying invoices; writing for and updating the Scottie website. Salary range is $30,000-$36,000 annually, benefits include cell phone reimbursement, performance bonuses, 401k matching and two weeks vacation. Send resumes to Abigail@scottiepa.com

Congressional Campaign Interns Needed

2018 has the potential to be a banner year, and Western Pennsylvania has more competitive congressional races than any cycle in recent memory.

Scottie Public Affairs is helping candidates in two districts with two very different congressional campaigns. We are looking for interns who are interested in being on the ground level. Intern responsibilities will vary, but assisting the fundraising team in this stage will be a key component of duties. Other duties in the future could include staffing the candidate at events, assisting with social media, writing briefings, and field work. If you are interested in going out in the field, a car is a must-have. If you don't mind office work, access to public transportation to downtown Pittsburgh is fine. 

If you are interested in getting in on the ground level of campaigns, send a cover note and resume to abigail at scottiepa dot com. 

Even if you hated this campaign cycle, business and non-profit leaders can learn from it...

Surely no one in America, probably including the candidates themselves, wants this election season to go on a moment longer than when the polls close on Tuesday night. But buried under the vitriol and mudslinging, campaigns provide valuable communications lessons that any corporate and nonprofit leader can benefit from.